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how does order of and matter in a query with join clause

I found different results using below queries

 SELECT A..COLA, B.COLB 
 FROM TABLEA A
 INNER JOIN TABLEB B ON B.COLA = A.COLA
 LEFT OUTER JOIN TABLEC C ON C.COLB = B.COLB 
 AND B.COLC IN ('','Y','O')
 WHERE A.COLD = 'XYZ'

 SELECT A..COLA, B.COLB 
 FROM TABLEA A
 INNER JOIN TABLEB B ON B.COLA = A.COLA
 AND B.COLC IN ('','Y','O')
 LEFT OUTER JOIN TABLEC C ON C.COLB = B.COLB 
 WHERE A.COLD = 'XYZ'

I need to understand why does position of and matter when it refers to a specific table - in this case TABLEB. In the first query the output does not consider AND operator but in the second query. Thanks.

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asked Aug 15, 2012 at 01:54 PM in Default

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visrah
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3 answers: sort voted first

The point that both @Fatherjack and @Scot Hauder are trying to make is that an INNER JOIN uses the join predicates to actively filter out the entire result set. The matching data from both sides of the join will be returned and nothing else.

An OUTER JOIN on the other hand takes the data from the "driving" table (TableA in your example) and joins to TableB using the join predicate you specify and tries to collect matching data for the entire selected set of TableA. If there is no corresponding data in TableB you get NULLs returned in place of data for TableB.

If you add additional ANDs to an INNER JOIN it doesn't matter if they are in the JOIN or in the WHERE section of the query. They equate to the same filtering operation in the end so the Query Optimizer will generate the same plan for both ways.

If you add additional ANDs to an OUTER JOIN, placing it in the JOIN will change how the outer table (TableB) is joined and probably just increase the amount of NULLs produced. If you move the same AND down to the WHERE clause, you will find that your result set will be filtered according to the entire WHERE clause and end up with less rows than if you had the AND in the JOIN.

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answered Aug 16, 2012 at 06:50 AM

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WilliamD
26.2k 18 34 48

+1. I think you nailed the explaination.

Aug 16, 2012 at 10:30 AM Magnus Ahlkvist
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In the first you are saying

 INNER JOIN TABLEB B ON B.COLA = A.COLA
 LEFT OUTER JOIN TABLEC C ON C.COLB = B.COLB 
                             AND B.COLC IN ('','Y','O')

and in the second

 INNER JOIN TABLEB B ON B.COLA = A.COLA
                        AND B.COLC IN ('','Y','O')
 LEFT OUTER JOIN TABLEC C ON C.COLB = B.COLB 

So, firstly rows are filtered by the join between C and B where the columns match AND B.COLC has to be in the options whereas in the last option returns rows where the join on B and A matches AND B.COLC is in the list of options.

These are two very different queries.

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answered Aug 15, 2012 at 02:01 PM

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Fatherjack ♦♦
43.7k 79 98 117

Jonathan thanks for the answer but i didn't quite follow your explanation. Do you think you/someone can explain me with an example (with data) so that it would be easy for me to understand?

I appreciate your help.

Aug 15, 2012 at 05:17 PM visrah
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Another example may drive the point home. When using outer joins you need to be mindful of what is in the JOIN condition and what is in the WHERE clause. With INNER joins this is not an issue:

 CREATE TABLE #TableA([ColA] [int],[ColB] [int])
 CREATE TABLE #TableB([ColA] [int],[ColB] [int])
 INSERT #TableA VALUES(1,1),(1,2),(1,3)
 INSERT #TableB VALUES(1,1),(1,2)
 
 
 -- using LEFT joins -----------------------
 SELECT *
 FROM #TableA ta
 LEFT JOIN #TableB tb ON (ta.ColA = tb.ColA 
                      AND ta.ColB = tb.ColB)
 /* NOT equivalent to */
 SELECT *
 FROM #TableA ta
 LEFT JOIN #TableB tb ON (ta.ColA = tb.ColA)
 WHERE ta.ColB = tb.ColB
 
 -- using INNER joins -----------------------
 SELECT *
 FROM #TableA ta
 JOIN #TableB tb ON (ta.ColA = tb.ColA 
                 AND ta.ColB = tb.ColB)
 /* IS equivalent to */
 SELECT *
 FROM #TableA ta
 JOIN #TableB tb ON (ta.ColA = tb.ColA) 
 WHERE ta.ColB = tb.ColB
 
 DROP TABLE #TableA, #TableB
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answered Aug 15, 2012 at 11:50 PM

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Scot Hauder
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asked: Aug 15, 2012 at 01:54 PM

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Last Updated: Aug 16, 2012 at 10:30 AM

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