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JavaRocky avatar image
JavaRocky asked

How can i strengthen my Oracle-fu?

I am looking for some books or resources to increase knowledge and awareness of the Oracle RDBMS so I can apply this to my work as a developer.

This is in hope of avoiding the 'I should of optimised my application to use the database more appropriately' situation.

I have been reading Tom Kyte's "Expert Oracle Database Architecture: 9i and 10g Programming Techniques and Solutions". Is this still the way to go?

Are there any other recommended books or resources to use?

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KillerDBA avatar image KillerDBA commented ·
Please update your question with a summary of your experience level. If you've got a few years' behind you, there's no point suggesting a book for beginners. On the other hand, if you're new to Oracle, that changes things.
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sydoracle avatar image
sydoracle answered

That's a good book that will give you a firm grounding on Oracle principles. Generally speaking most companies using Oracle will be on the conservative side, so you are more likely to see 10g in production use than 11g. However it is a good idea to know what will come up in future.

To that end I'd suggest

  1. Subscribe to the Oracle magazine. It is the official source, so is hardly unbiased, but will tell you where they see things going. I'd expect a fair chunk will be devoted to Java now Oracle has taken over Sun.

  2. For developers, you can get a newsletter by Steven Feuerstein here He's also kicking off a PL/SQL challenge starting in April which should be good for honing skills

  3. Pick a few blogs to read up on. OraNA.info aggregates most of them. Subscribe for a few weeks, pick out the ones that interest you and keep up with their individual items. I recommend Jonathan Lewis and Tim Hall (Oracle-base.com). There are lots of others if you have particular interests (eg security, Apex, etc).

  4. If there is a local user group, that may be good. I joined the Sydney Oracle Meetup through meetups.com

  5. Follow one of the forums. If you don't know the answers, you'll pick up some techniques quickly enough. If you do, it is a chance to test them out plus be able to explain features.

  6. At least have XE installed on a machine for 'playing around'. Its better to download and install a full Enterprise version if you want to experiment with partitioning, bitmaps indexes etc.

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JavaRocky avatar image JavaRocky commented ·
Thank you Gary, your Oracle-fu is most strong. Will follow your advise.
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Leigh Riffel avatar image Leigh Riffel commented ·
+1 All excellent suggestions.
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dmann avatar image
dmann answered

Do you do any significant amount of development in PL/SQL? I have been a DBA and Developer for 10+ years. I have come to realize that time spent tuning PL/SQL code usually pays off faster/earlier than trying to dive deep into the database internals and tweak optimizer parameters.

That said, I thought I was pretty good at PL/SQL. After picking up the most recent edition of Steven Feuerstein's I now know there is still a lot to learn. Its big (1200 pages) but definitely worth a cover to cover read if you do any significant amount of coding in PL/SQL.

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Leigh Riffel avatar image Leigh Riffel commented ·
+1 Performance problems are usually solved in the programmers code not in the database settings.
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JavaRocky avatar image JavaRocky commented ·
I do not do any PL/SQL. The enterprise i work for sadly frowns upon writing procedures. They'd rather use 100 layers of abstraction and then do it one record at a time in another language. However, I would like to intimately become aquainted with PL/SQL for my own knowledge, future work, and possibly provide benchmarks on alternatives than the 100 layers of abstraction. If there are any other PL/SQL resources you recommend, I'd definately look them up. Thanks.
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Leigh Riffel avatar image
Leigh Riffel answered

The Oracle Concepts guide is a must read. The 11.2 version was re-written and is better than previous versions. Almost all the information is still relevant to 10g.

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e10713.pdf

You could also read the administrators guide.

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e10595.pdf

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JavaRocky avatar image JavaRocky commented ·
Indeed they are good resources. I will re-read the 11.2 versions. Thank you.
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