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ebzm avatar image
ebzm asked

project status report

Can someone guide me on how to present a report on SQL server projects to management? I would highly appreciate it. Thanks.
sqlsql-server
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Tim avatar image
Tim answered
Can you give us a bit more information such as what it is you are wanting to report on?
2 comments
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As a DBA, you work on different projects like consolidation, migration, inventory, backups, performance, etc...how do you present that to mgt to show the status regularly? or what tools would you use?
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For backups, disk space, number of databases etc I use good ole T-SQL Scripts. When it comes to consolidation projects or migrations we engage our PMO group who tracks the progress of those projects using a tool called Planview or some prefer MS Project. With those larger projects I use Excel myself to keep up with my tasks.
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Fatherjack avatar image
Fatherjack answered
If this is a requirement of a project then the style, format and content of these reports should have been details in the project documentation already. If it isnt then go to all the potential recipients of the report and gather their requirements. They will have to use the data so it needs to work for them. Find out what they want to know, how often then need to know it(daily, weekly, monthly, on completion, etc) and how they want to be told(person to person in meeting, email, SSRS report, telephone call etc). Once you have that then you can start to design the reporting framework and get some updates out to the key project members
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Magnus Ahlkvist avatar image
Magnus Ahlkvist answered
On any project, SQL Server, .NET, MQSeries integration project etc, I'm using a very simple method for day-to-day project progress followup: Excel. I create a Work Breakdown Structure in the beginning of the project, where I outline all the tasks, and set calendertime and responsible person to each task. A column in the chart represents a week and a row represents a task. A task can stretch over any number of cells. Each task can have any number of subtasks, and subtasks can have subtasks etc. I'm colouring in blue for planned tasks, green for tasks finished on time, pink for finished late and red for late and not finished. I know it sounds pretty stone-age, but it gives a nice overview and it's easy to work with. If you keep the WBS updated each week you always have an up-to-date report on the project progress, and you can spend time investigating/explaining only the tasks which are late/failed/changed etc. Management will never ask any questions about tasks which have finished on (reasonably) time or that are planned to finish on time.
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MS Project can allow you to use WBS codes etc, but I don't think it'll generate pretty WBS pictures. It's been a while since I tried, though. Whatever you end up trying, though, keep it simple to keep it updated - you don't want to tie up too much time generating management gumph!
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I've never seen MSProject do ~anything~ pretty. #AlmostAsBadAsMSWord
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@Fatherjack - MS Project is not doing pretty, but it's simpler than Excel when you need to replan a task's enddate, and have dependent tasks move accordingly. If I'd use MS Project daily, I would create macros for report exports.
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Stone Age is good if it works for everyone using it. +1
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