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DaniSQL avatar image
DaniSQL asked

Slow Friday: What is your favorite book of all time(max 10)?

warning/appology: this is not SQL related post: Hello, Today is a slow Friday and I was hoping you will make it interesting by telling us your favourite books of all time. I got a new kindle and I am reading Grant Fritchey's [Dissecting Execution plan][1] now. I am looking forward to reading broad range of books . Please share your top 10 favorite books of all time, books that if given the power you will force everybody to read:-) (you can share only one or two if thats what comes to your mind). I prefer if the list is this way: 6 for database/sql server/IT, 2 non fiction and 2 fiction. Thanks. [1]: http://www.amazon.com/Server-Execution-Plans-Grant-Fritchey/dp/1906434026
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Steve Jones Editor avatar image
Steve Jones Editor answered
- Inside SQL Server, the Ben-Gan, and Delaney ones - Query Performance by Fritchey - Wrox SSIS, Brian Knight, et al Not a lot else right now. Have more to go through, but I think most of the SQL books are about 80% the same. Non-fiction - On Writing by Stephen King, really enjoyed that - The Treasure Hunter - Moore and Jennings. Read this multiple times as a kid. A real life tale of treasure hunters that might inspire you to let go of you life and enjoy it more. Fiction - Red Thunder (sci fi) - Varley. I love it, have sent it to a few friends, my kids loved it. - Odd Thomas - Koontz, really enjoyed it and made me think about life.
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Thanks Steve. I know you are avid reader.
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Tim avatar image
Tim answered
Favorite books. Well first gotta say the Bible. In regards to SQL I am enjoying "SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Dstilled" by Grant Fritchey and Sajal Dam. When I finish that I have to pick between 1) "Performance Tuning with SQL Server Dynamic Management Views" by Louis Davidson and Tim Ford 2) "Pro SQL Server 2008 Policy-Based Management" by Ken Simmons, Colin St5asiuk, and Jorge Segarra 3) "DBA Survivor: Become a RockStar DBA" by Thomas Larock. All are part of my collection of SQL books. Out side of SQL I don't read much but I used to enjoy John Grishom books, and I must admit I did get sucked into the entire Harry Potter series. As for my favorite book, I very much enjoyed reading the "Cuckoo's Egg - Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage" The book is based on a true story. I read that book in 1995.
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Thanks. I have read SQLRockstar's DBA survivor when it came out. Good 3hr read especially for aspiring/New DBAs.
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I picked it up at our last SQL Pass Chapter meeting. If it is only a quick 3 hour read I may knock it out next and pass it on to another aspiring DBA.
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TimothyAWiseman avatar image
TimothyAWiseman answered
I will agree with TRAD that the Bible is the most significant book I have read. Beyond that: SQL: I think Professional SQL Server 2005 Adfministration is one of the best reference books I have. I would not recommend sitting down and reading it through, but it is an excellent quick reference. Non-Fiction: The Four Loves by C.S. Lewis, A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawkings, and Visual Complex Analysis (still in process of reading this, but the part I have read was both enlightening and helpful) Fiction: This one is tough. I used to read a lot of good fiction before I went to grad school, and very little since I started. With that said, a couple stick out in my mind. Cold Equations was only a short story, but one that made a big impact on me. Neuromancer is a classic. And the Watchmen graphic novel was absolutely masterful.
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Thanks Tim. I read A brief history of time a while ago, and I love it. I will check cold equations....the title is interesting.
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Oleg avatar image
Oleg answered
My most favourite SQL Server books are **Guru's Guide to Transact SQL** and **The Guru's Guide to SQL Server Stored Procedures, XML, and HTML** by late Ken Henderson (may he rest in peace). I consider the chapter in the first titled **Mighty Select** as the best read ever. The book I think many should consider to purchase is **SQL Server MVP Deep Dives**, and not just because of the great cause (every pence, or should I say dime, of the proceeds is donated to War Child International). Usually, the rumor has it that if you see too many authors then the book is probably not great, but this book is definitely different. You get 59 chapters written by 53 experts, and every chapter is interesting and helpful regardless of the reader's level. As for non-technical books, I enjoy everything by O. Henry, Jack London, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Anton Chekhov Oleg
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Why oh why did I forget to mention SQL Server MVP Deep Dives. I love this book. I have only read about 15 of the chapters so far. I really must do a better job of finishing books that I start but what is so great about SQL Server MVP Deep Dives is it really is like reading 59 short stories. Its wonderful.
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Oleg, Great List. thanks. I haven't yet read the MVP deep dives, but its on top of my list.
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Grant Fritchey avatar image
Grant Fritchey answered
SQL: The Inside Series. I've been reading them since version 6.5. I'm not done with it but, Louis Davidson & Tim Ford's book on DMO's, "Performance Tuning with SQL Server Dynamic Management Views," is a must. Another vote for SQL Server MVP Deep Dives. Fiction (only 10?) in no particular order: - Have Spacesuit Will Travel - The Moon is a Harsh Mistress - Monster Hunter International - Sharpe's Rifles (and pretty much the whole series) - River World - Four Feathers - A Matter for Men (and the rest of that series) - On Stranger Tides - Orbital Decay - Dresden Files (they just keep getting better) - Pride & Prejudice (yeah, wanna make something of it?) Forgot non-fiction: - Like Wolves on the fold - Strong on Defense - How Can Man Die Better - Landscape Turned Red - On Combat
4 comments
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I actually have Pride and Prejudice sitting on my desk at work. I also have Ware and Peace and the Brothers Karamazov (sp).
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wonderful list. thanks.
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I violated the rules a bit, but I can't list just a few books, ever. Thanks.
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Its merely a rule...I am glad you violated it
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Matt Whitfield avatar image
Matt Whitfield answered
seeing as this is supposed to be non sql related... the moomin books don Quixote feersum enjinn by iain m banks
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heard non of them. I will check them out...thanks
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Mark avatar image
Mark answered
OK, I know I'm going to be the big oddball here. I was a philosophy and psychology major, but liked reading philosophy much more - even if it can get terribly tedious at times. David Hume and Nietzsche are two of my favorites. I've been meaning to go back to Spinoza though - he was amazing. But be careful with Nietzsche, you just don't casually pick up his work and start reading since he demands a lot from his reader - a sweeping knowledge of history, philosophy, literature, and Greek tragedy to name just a few topics he had mastered. (A good deal of it is lost on me, I'll admit, since I'm not well read in all of the fields he draws upon.) But if you dare, his **Beyond Good and Evil** is one of his most readable works. By the way, I don't agree with him. As somewhat of an iconoclast, he would probably appreciate that actually. Often it's understanding *why* I don't agree with him is the most intriguing part of it all. That, and he's not tedious to read - he's usually very short and to the point.
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Thanks mark. I will check out Nietzsche's book. a fried suggested to me and I have been interested in his work years ago but never got the chance to read his works yet.
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I tend to disagree strongly with Nietzsche myself, though he was certainly interesting to read. In a similar vein, you may want to look at Soren Kierkregaard. He takes a much more moralistic and Christian view to the same topics Nietzsche espoused and alos wroute quote powerfully. I am particularly fond of his "Sickness Unto Death".
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Timothy, I never really "got" Kierkegaard although I do like existentialism. When I read him, one minute he sounds like he was arguing for Christianity, and the next against it. Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is one of the best I've read on religion.
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CirqueDeSQLeil avatar image
CirqueDeSQLeil answered
For me, I enjoyed Les Miserables (the original unabridged tomes) and The HunchBack of Notre Dame. In SQL Server, I think MVP Deep Dives should be high on the list.
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Thanks Jason.
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David Wimbush avatar image
David Wimbush answered
Here are some books I like. **SQL** 1. Itzik ben Gan's Inside TSQL Querying 2. MVP Deep Dives 3. HitchHiker's Guide to Reporting Services 4. SQL Server 2008 Internals **Non-Fiction** 1. Code by Charles Petzold 2. Hackers by Steven Levy 3. The Code Book by Simon Singh **Fiction** 1. Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson (An amazing blend of 2nd World War codebreaking and modern day hacking - just brilliant. After about 10 pages I was loving it and then I realised there were about another 900 pages to go!) 2. Excession by Iain Banks (Among other things, the names the starships' AIs choose for themselves are priceless and their banter with each other is great.) 3. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (The twist at the end is wicked!)
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Great list, haven't read Ender's Game, seems to be some criticism on his "plain" writing style... I would also recommend: Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield...Also, +1 to everyone for not listing The Art of War :)
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Hi Scot. I don't care what the critics think - Ender's Game is a great book. And The Art of War isn't bad but I prefer The Book of Five Rings.
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Great List David.
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