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Steps to follow on SQL after Server reboot on Machine?

Hi Experts, We are using SQL 2005, Windows server 2003.I am new to SQL DBA Domain. Our Infrastrucure IT is planning a maintenance update to the way SQL Server is configured on Server Machine.This change is intended to help minimize the CPU usage on the server, which has been higher than desired. SQL Server is configured to use all available processing space on the server, leaving none left over for the operating system on the server itself. So can any one tell me what kind of steps to follow after server reboot on SQL? What configurations have to check in SQL Server after server reboot like connections are working correctly or not?
sql-server-2005windows-server-2003servers
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Grant Fritchey avatar image Grant Fritchey ♦♦ commented ·
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Grant Fritchey avatar image Grant Fritchey ♦♦ commented ·
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Grant Fritchey answered
After just a reboot of the system? I usually check connectivity and that's it. Unless the system has crashed, there's usually very little to worry about. If a system has crashed, I'd suggest DBCC CHECKDB, but for a controlled shutdown, this just isn't needed. If you're really feeling paranoid, maybe look at the error log after the server is back online to see if there were any errors recorded during the start up process that didn't prevent the server from coming online (very rare, but possible). You can also validate that all the databases are online.
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sqlqa avatar image sqlqa commented ·
Thankx Grant Fritchey Is it possible to check Any configurations are properly working or not like TCP/IP Pipeline or SSIS or anything else?
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Grant Fritchey avatar image Grant Fritchey ♦♦ commented ·
Agent might not restart if it's not configured to, but no, a server reboot, and just a server reboot, shouldn't go out and reconfigure TCP/IP or anything else like that. In general, if the server comes back up without error and you can connect to it, you're largely done. But that relaxed attitude is only applicable for a controlled shut down. A crash changes everything.
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sqlaj 1 answered
As Grant mentioned you don't need to reboot the server to find out the configuration settings for SQL Server. You described CPU issues. High CPU is not the cause it is a symptom of other issues on the server. Memory, badly formed queries, missing indexes... Glenn Berry has T-SQL scripts on his blog specifically for SQL 2005. > **SQL Server Diagnostic Information Queries** > http://sqlserverperformance.wordpress.com/2013/12/17/sql-server-diagnostic-information-queries-for-december-2013/ His scripts provide brief information on what to look for. There are some specific to configuration, CPU, and Indexes that may be contributing to the high CPU issues you are seeing.
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