x

What is a #Cursor

Seeder question

This is a Regular Cursor

Declare MyCursor cursor for
Select Id, Name 
From Customer

This is a #Cursor

Declare #MyCursor cursor for
Select Id, Name 
From Customer

Questions:

  1. What is the difference?
    • Is one preferred over the other?
    • Is it the same difference as in a TABLE and a #TABLE?
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asked Mar 19, 2010 at 03:38 PM in Default

Raj More gravatar image

Raj More
1.7k 80 82 84

+1 - nice seeder q
Mar 19, 2010 at 04:11 PM Matt Whitfield ♦♦
Excellent question.
Mar 19, 2010 at 04:31 PM Grant Fritchey ♦♦
Nice question. Not sure I know that this is anything more than a naming convention. I typically declare cursors with an @ symbol. In the rare occasion that I use a cursor.
Mar 19, 2010 at 07:10 PM CirqueDeSQLeil
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2 answers: sort voted first

I believe the origin of this goes back to Pandora. When she opened the box, the ills and mischief of man and all that is evil spilled out, leaving only one thing left in the box--that thing was not a cursor...

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answered Mar 19, 2010 at 09:10 PM

Scot Hauder gravatar image

Scot Hauder
6k 13 15 18

Awesome answer.
Mar 20, 2010 at 01:56 AM TimothyAWiseman
+1 - epic suggestion, off to update wikipedia's Pandora's Box entry ...
Mar 20, 2010 at 07:41 AM Fatherjack ♦♦
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I believe this just to be a naming convention and a matter of preference. If I use a cursor I use the following:

Declare @MyCursor cursor for Select Id, Name From Customer 
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answered Mar 19, 2010 at 07:13 PM

CirqueDeSQLeil gravatar image

CirqueDeSQLeil
4.5k 10 11 15

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asked: Mar 19, 2010 at 03:38 PM

Seen: 1563 times

Last Updated: Mar 26, 2010 at 02:51 PM